See if you can spot the Collie dog

My mum’s dog loves her photo being taken! 

Way back in June 2018, incidentally this year turned out to be one of the longest driest and warmest on record, I took one of my many walks deep into the Windrush Valley situated in the edge of the Cotswolds.

And you’ll have guessed, for those readers following my WordPress, I was accompanied by walking friend Holly the cross collie and not forgetting my trusty cheap Fuji little camera. Incidentally it cost £8 off eBay!

It takes stunning photos when the sun’s out and absolutely awful ones when the sun disappears?

Well cutting a short story even shorter! I’d always intended to share with the readers but being truthful a blog idea ALWAYS popped up from nowhere? Anyways the other evening I came across a picture folder and it suddenly dawned on me Holly actually got herself into nearly every photograph!

Like I said she loves the camera 😀

Anyways (it amuses me ‘anyways’ is a favourite word of mine) rather than just looking at MY photos of the Oxfordshire countryside, why not play a game and try and spot Holly just as if you were trying to spot the ball,

🤔and whatever happened to spot the ball competitions? Did the internet kill the game off? Discuss! No! 

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Holly my mum’s Colle cross dog
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Wild Poppy

Above wild red poppies growing amongst the fields of crops, and I could imagine soldiers fighting in the trenches on the Western Front, if they’d turned and gazed across French cornfields they’d see blood red poppies .

Must have been quite a sight the vivid red int erspersing golden yellow in summertime, not forgetting WW1 was another human made tragedy.

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I’m not quite sure what type of cash crop is being grown in our local fields now? When I was a child I remember golden corn, as for now I guess this could be……… who knows what’s planted, any farmers out there. And notice in the foreground wildflowers growing alongside the path we’re  walking on.

Above is a montage of photos of this unknown plant and the path I’m on, keep in mind I am walking a circular route.

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Fields of long grass, no crops here

Below we’ve no walked into an animal grazing field interspersed with daisy’s.

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If I were to lay these 4 photos out they’d be a sequenced panorama view.

Below and we’re back on the trail through natural tree canopy branches.

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Above one of several ponds that lie along our walk, are you playing my game of spot the collie?

Below left and you can just make out Minster Lovel ruins, it’s behind Holly in the distance. I swear she must have walked into the shot as soon as I took my camera out.

Below a church built from golden Cotswold stone looking resplendent under the sun, I cannot be bothered to Google the name lol (I’m half an hour into this post already and I’m freezing and in need of a hot shower), except to say it’s very old and lies on the outskirts of Minster Lovell village. (We’re in Oxfordshire btw).

Notice the small pink flowers and green moss growing on the Cotswold stone wall in the foreground.

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Cotswold stone is very unique to the area!

On reflection I should have enlarged the three photos above, you can btw, because bottom right shows Minster Lovell Ruins with said church behind the trouble is I managed to get the gatepost into shot as well.

Bottom left is me standing inside the ruins looking up towards the sky. That leaves photo three which tells you all about the ruins. I guess you could Wikipedia?

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All these photographs are a reminder Britain still has beautiful countryside if you look hard enough.

Below isn’t a natural water spring, these pools form where small streams meet the pathway used by farm tractors.

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Pathway pools of Oxfordshire water

(Below) Me gazing down toward Crawley village.

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A closer shot of the bridge leading out of Crawley village

Below a photograph very important to the history of this area, VERY IMPORATANT, yes it’s a sheep……… well keeping the tale short sheep were raised on the green fields encircling my Town, consequently 8 or so Mills weaved the wool into blankets later shipped around the world…………. the reason a railway was built and a reason why this part of Oxfordshire became very prosperous.

Have you ever heard of Witney blankets?

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A Cotswold sheep, there used to be fields full of them!!

Below I’m walking beneath the overhanging canopy of trees, and no it’s not a natural scene, the avenue was planted many years ago, is very long, and follows a busy road which takes me back toward my mother’s home.

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A tree lined Avenue and quite spectacular

I hope you enjoyed looking at the views taken along the Windrush Valley one June summer’s afternoon.

A. Shepherdson 2018

(Feel free to download copy any picture (or all 48) if you wish, 😊you have my blessing and please do, thank you.)

 

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12 thoughts on “See if you can spot the Collie dog

  1. St Kenelm’s parish church. (I’m a good little googler). It’s a beautiful church. So the Witney sheep disappeared along with the Witney blankets, all because the railway had disappeared – I read about this in an earlier post. What a pity. The photos are great and Holly is a natural born model.

    Liked by 1 person

    • 🙂 I should say thank you for finding the St Kenelm’s..………. how did we ever manage with out Google. The last blanket Mill closed mid eighties which is such a shame, I remember passing one Mill on my way to school, and come summertime they’d have the windows open and you could hear the looms working. Yes sheep, green fields, wool wealth and trains are all entwined in fact one of my railway photos shows a blanket train made of 20 wagons…..….. oh and thank you Hester for being my number one fan, I really do appreciate it. ❤ (Haha and now you know I live in Witney!!!!!)

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Love the walk through those beautiful fields, and yes Holly managed to get in many of them..
    I think maybe that crop is rapeseed oil, was the field once bright yellow with flowers? they let the seed pods ripen on the plant before harvest then the seeds are crushed to make oil.
    Looking I see remnants of yellow flowers.. I could be wrong.. But the close up of the poppies show the seed pods..
    And yes I love the sight of fields of poppies, and purposely set them along the edges of our allotment to attract bees.. This year we have set lupin seeds along there too, So we will wait to see what happens next year.
    Love the village and church, and dry-stone walls .. The Moon Penny Daisies in the field took me back to my childhood, when I would pick bunches of them to take home and put in a jam jar vase.. 🙂
    The natural water spring is lovely, I bet there are frogs and newts in there too.. Did you see any of the pond life?
    Thank you for sharing your walk.. Loved the tiny pathways where Holly is running..
    Enjoy your week Andrew..
    Take care..

    Liked by 1 person

    • Holly’s my mum’s collie and a great walking companion, she gets terrifically excited when she sees me walking up the drive, understandably 😀 !!! Come to think of it many fields around here turn yellow, I can vaguely remember the majority being green grassland with sheep but that’s before the Blanket Mills closed. Later in the season I collect those centre poppy pods just before holes appear at the top, then I have been known to sow them in the garden along with purple cornflowers. Ahh and so those are moon penny daisies!!! I’ve wondered what those little white flowers are called…………. one day I’ll buy a collie of my own……….. perhaps when I retire (a few years off!) Thank you and have a great week yourself 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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